Mānoa Heritage Center

E Komo Mai

Welcome to Mānoa Heritage Center – a 3.5 acre living classroom that promotes an understanding of Hawaiʻi’s cultural and natural heritage.

Visit the Center

Come and be inspired!

A guided tour of Mānoa Heritage Center gardens and Kūkaʻōʻō Heiau introduces visitors to the beauty of Hawaiʻi’s unique cultural and natural heritage.

 

MHC Public Programming Update

Aloha mai kākou,

We have returned our public tour capacity to 10 guests (max) on weekday afternoons and select Saturday mornings. Please see Event Calendar for specific dates and times and to register for a tour.

In addition, we ask if you are not feeling well, to please consider staying home and rescheduling your visit.

Thank you for helping us to keep our community safe. We hope to see you soon!

We want to leave you with this quote shared by our friends at the Polynesian Voyaging Society:

“We are each made for goodness, love, and compassion.  Our lives are transformed as much as the world is when we live with these truths.”

– Archbishop Desmond Mpilo Tutu

PLAN A VISIT

Enjoy this introduction to Mānoa Heritage Center created by recent Mid-Pacific graduate Garrison Lagapa (class of 2018). This short film was a senior project, and part of receiving his Hawaiian Studies certificate.

Connect - Learn - Share

We are committed to working with the community to nurture responsible stewardship practices and invite you to join our ʻohana as volunteers and partners.

VOLUNTEER

BECOME A PARTNER
Open to all ages and running from June 3rd to June 12th (King Kamehameha Day, June 11, will be observed), Mānoa Heritage Center’s Summer Hula Camp returns this summer and looks to build on our previous hula camps. Kumu Kilohana Silve of Hālau Hula o Mānoa will integrate ma ka hana ka ‘ike hands-on activities while sharing mo‘olelo (stories) and teaching a new hula noho (“Auhea O Ka Lani”) to participants at this 7-day hula workshop.  Running from 9 a.m. to 12 p.m. daily, those interested in a week of learning, dancing and chanting can sign up for our annual Summer Hula Camp by hitting the link in our profile bio. All ages are welcome—last year our class age range spanned from 5 to 92!—and no previous hula experience is needed to attend.
Open to all ages and running from June 3rd to June 12th (King Kamehameha Day, June 11, will be observed), Mānoa Heritage Center’s Summer Hula Camp returns this summer and looks to build on our previous hula camps. Kumu Kilohana Silve of Hālau Hula o Mānoa will integrate ma ka hana ka ‘ike hands-on activities while sharing mo‘olelo (stories) and teaching a new hula noho (“Auhea O Ka Lani”) to participants at this 7-day hula workshop.  Running from 9 a.m. to 12 p.m. daily, those interested in a week of learning, dancing and chanting can sign up for our annual Summer Hula Camp by hitting the link in our profile bio. All ages are welcome—last year our class age range spanned from 5 to 92!—and no previous hula experience is needed to attend.
Open to all ages and running from June 3rd to June 12th (King Kamehameha Day, June 11, will be observed), Mānoa Heritage Center’s Summer Hula Camp returns this summer and looks to build on our previous hula camps. Kumu Kilohana Silve of Hālau Hula o Mānoa will integrate ma ka hana ka ‘ike hands-on activities while sharing mo‘olelo (stories) and teaching a new hula noho (“Auhea O Ka Lani”) to participants at this 7-day hula workshop. Running from 9 a.m. to 12 p.m. daily, those interested in a week of learning, dancing and chanting can sign up for our annual Summer Hula Camp by hitting the link in our profile bio. All ages are welcome—last year our class age range spanned from 5 to 92!—and no previous hula experience is needed to attend.
2 days ago
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1/9
Working to refurbish and restore a water catchment and plant nursery that Hanahauʻoli School students built five years ago, this year’s class of 4th and 5th graders were kept busy working with Uncle Kevin on a variety of tasks. From stabilizing support pillars to building a compost deck, making water catchment gutters, crafting cabinets and more, these wonderful keiki accomplished so much in the months they spent working on property.  Mahalo nui loa keiki of Hanahauʻoli School for the hard work and a big thank you to @malama.manoa for funding the project with a generous contribution.
Working to refurbish and restore a water catchment and plant nursery that Hanahauʻoli School students built five years ago, this year’s class of 4th and 5th graders were kept busy working with Uncle Kevin on a variety of tasks. From stabilizing support pillars to building a compost deck, making water catchment gutters, crafting cabinets and more, these wonderful keiki accomplished so much in the months they spent working on property.  Mahalo nui loa keiki of Hanahauʻoli School for the hard work and a big thank you to @malama.manoa for funding the project with a generous contribution.
Working to refurbish and restore a water catchment and plant nursery that Hanahauʻoli School students built five years ago, this year’s class of 4th and 5th graders were kept busy working with Uncle Kevin on a variety of tasks. From stabilizing support pillars to building a compost deck, making water catchment gutters, crafting cabinets and more, these wonderful keiki accomplished so much in the months they spent working on property. Mahalo nui loa keiki of Hanahauʻoli School for the hard work and a big thank you to @malama.manoa for funding the project with a generous contribution.
3 days ago
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2/9
Lei Day at Mānoa Heritage Center was spent making lei with University of Hawaiʻi at Mānoa staff and faculty, and our wonderful educators Keʻala and Jenny led a small group in making ti leaf lei.  In 1929, Lei Day was officially recognized as a holiday in Hawaiʻi, however the first Lei Day was observed in 1927. A celebration of Hawaiʻi’s culture and the art of making lei, Lei Day stands as a symbol of aloha and is one of our island’s best smelling and most colorful holidays.
Lei Day at Mānoa Heritage Center was spent making lei with University of Hawaiʻi at Mānoa staff and faculty, and our wonderful educators Keʻala and Jenny led a small group in making ti leaf lei. In 1929, Lei Day was officially recognized as a holiday in Hawaiʻi, however the first Lei Day was observed in 1927. A celebration of Hawaiʻi’s culture and the art of making lei, Lei Day stands as a symbol of aloha and is one of our island’s best smelling and most colorful holidays.
3 weeks ago
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3/9
To conclude this month of celebrating native plants, we set our sights on the wiliwili, also known as the Erithryina sandwicensis. Wiliwili, named for the way their seed pods twist and turn, is the only endemic Erythrina to Hawaiʻi, with many relatives spanning Africa, Asia and the Americas. Although their gorgeous blooms won’t be present until Oct—Nov, this dryland tree is currently entering the deciduous period of their seasonal cycle, where many of its leaves shed and is a marvel in itself! Dropping many, if not all, leaves helps the tree reduce the amount of water required to sustain itself through our hot, dry summers. The specimen on our campus has yet to flower since being planted in 2018, but the abundance of leaf litter these past few days is starting to get our hopes up—tune in later this year to see if our hunch is right!
3 weeks ago
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4/9
Hōʻawa (Pittosporum hosmeri) is an endemic shrub/tree whose fruit was once a primary food source for the ‘alalā, the only remaining endemic corvid (crow) in Hawaiʻi—which is now extinct in the wild. The genus name, Pittosporum, derived from the Greek word for “pitch-seed,” refers to its large sticky seeds, and the specific epithet hosmeri refers to Hawaiʻi’s first territorial forester, Ralph Sheldon Hosmer.  Hosmer, acting on behalf of the Hawaiian Sugar Planters’ Association and the Territorial Government, guided forth Act 44 on April 25th, 1903, placing a quarter of Hawaiian lands, which consisted of government buildings and private holdings, into Hawaiʻi’s Forest Reserve System. This was to combat both the drought that threatened economic interests of plantation owners, as well as to aid against the timber shortage plaguing the U.S. at the time.  Much like the symbiotic relationship between the hō’awa and ʻalalā, Hosmer realized that humans could not survive without a resilient watershed. Mānoa Heritage Center sends our mahalo to Hawaiian foresters of the past, present, and future, for planting trees whose shade they will never sit in.  I ka wā ma mua, ka wā ma hope.
Hōʻawa (Pittosporum hosmeri) is an endemic shrub/tree whose fruit was once a primary food source for the ‘alalā, the only remaining endemic corvid (crow) in Hawaiʻi—which is now extinct in the wild. The genus name, Pittosporum, derived from the Greek word for “pitch-seed,” refers to its large sticky seeds, and the specific epithet hosmeri refers to Hawaiʻi’s first territorial forester, Ralph Sheldon Hosmer.  Hosmer, acting on behalf of the Hawaiian Sugar Planters’ Association and the Territorial Government, guided forth Act 44 on April 25th, 1903, placing a quarter of Hawaiian lands, which consisted of government buildings and private holdings, into Hawaiʻi’s Forest Reserve System. This was to combat both the drought that threatened economic interests of plantation owners, as well as to aid against the timber shortage plaguing the U.S. at the time.  Much like the symbiotic relationship between the hō’awa and ʻalalā, Hosmer realized that humans could not survive without a resilient watershed. Mānoa Heritage Center sends our mahalo to Hawaiian foresters of the past, present, and future, for planting trees whose shade they will never sit in.  I ka wā ma mua, ka wā ma hope.
Hōʻawa (Pittosporum hosmeri) is an endemic shrub/tree whose fruit was once a primary food source for the ‘alalā, the only remaining endemic corvid (crow) in Hawaiʻi—which is now extinct in the wild. The genus name, Pittosporum, derived from the Greek word for “pitch-seed,” refers to its large sticky seeds, and the specific epithet hosmeri refers to Hawaiʻi’s first territorial forester, Ralph Sheldon Hosmer.  Hosmer, acting on behalf of the Hawaiian Sugar Planters’ Association and the Territorial Government, guided forth Act 44 on April 25th, 1903, placing a quarter of Hawaiian lands, which consisted of government buildings and private holdings, into Hawaiʻi’s Forest Reserve System. This was to combat both the drought that threatened economic interests of plantation owners, as well as to aid against the timber shortage plaguing the U.S. at the time.  Much like the symbiotic relationship between the hō’awa and ʻalalā, Hosmer realized that humans could not survive without a resilient watershed. Mānoa Heritage Center sends our mahalo to Hawaiian foresters of the past, present, and future, for planting trees whose shade they will never sit in.  I ka wā ma mua, ka wā ma hope.
Hōʻawa (Pittosporum hosmeri) is an endemic shrub/tree whose fruit was once a primary food source for the ‘alalā, the only remaining endemic corvid (crow) in Hawaiʻi—which is now extinct in the wild. The genus name, Pittosporum, derived from the Greek word for “pitch-seed,” refers to its large sticky seeds, and the specific epithet hosmeri refers to Hawaiʻi’s first territorial forester, Ralph Sheldon Hosmer. Hosmer, acting on behalf of the Hawaiian Sugar Planters’ Association and the Territorial Government, guided forth Act 44 on April 25th, 1903, placing a quarter of Hawaiian lands, which consisted of government buildings and private holdings, into Hawaiʻi’s Forest Reserve System. This was to combat both the drought that threatened economic interests of plantation owners, as well as to aid against the timber shortage plaguing the U.S. at the time. Much like the symbiotic relationship between the hō’awa and ʻalalā, Hosmer realized that humans could not survive without a resilient watershed. Mānoa Heritage Center sends our mahalo to Hawaiian foresters of the past, present, and future, for planting trees whose shade they will never sit in. I ka wā ma mua, ka wā ma hope.
3 weeks ago
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5/9
Our latest quarterly conservation lecture—Kahaukani Conversations—featured Dr. Patrick Hart, a biologist and avian researcher working for the University of Hawaiʻi at Hilo. In an hour-long Zoom discussion, Dr. Hart gave an insightful explanation about the extensive repertoire of bird song that can be vocalized by Hawaiʻi’s native birds—as well as how that vocabulary is shrinking due to our feathered friends’ dwindling population.  You can check out the full recording of Dr. Hart’s talk on our YouTube account by hitting the link in our bio.
Our latest quarterly conservation lecture—Kahaukani Conversations—featured Dr. Patrick Hart, a biologist and avian researcher working for the University of Hawaiʻi at Hilo. In an hour-long Zoom discussion, Dr. Hart gave an insightful explanation about the extensive repertoire of bird song that can be vocalized by Hawaiʻi’s native birds—as well as how that vocabulary is shrinking due to our feathered friends’ dwindling population. You can check out the full recording of Dr. Hart’s talk on our YouTube account by hitting the link in our bio.
3 weeks ago
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6/9
Uhiuhi (Mezoneuron kaviense) is a dry-mesic forest shrub/tree, and the only member of the Mezoneuron genus endemic to the Hawaiian Islands. (It is worth noting that its family, Fabaceae, harbors many Hawaiʻi natives including koa, wiliwili and ʻōhai.)  Thought to have arrived to the islands via ocean currents, the ancestors of this plant evolved with a trait that no other member of its genus had prior, arborescence—having the shape or characteristics of a tree.  Many of our native plants developed this trait due to them arriving as coastal inhabitants, then adapting and moving towards the stable, more consistent climate provided by upland wet forests. Uses for uhiuhi include utilizing its hard wood in hale building and tool making, as well as making lei with its gorgeous pink flowers.
Uhiuhi (Mezoneuron kaviense) is a dry-mesic forest shrub/tree, and the only member of the Mezoneuron genus endemic to the Hawaiian Islands. (It is worth noting that its family, Fabaceae, harbors many Hawaiʻi natives including koa, wiliwili and ʻōhai.) Thought to have arrived to the islands via ocean currents, the ancestors of this plant evolved with a trait that no other member of its genus had prior, arborescence—having the shape or characteristics of a tree. Many of our native plants developed this trait due to them arriving as coastal inhabitants, then adapting and moving towards the stable, more consistent climate provided by upland wet forests. Uses for uhiuhi include utilizing its hard wood in hale building and tool making, as well as making lei with its gorgeous pink flowers.
1 month ago
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7/9
Our Mānoa Heritage Center Education Team—and Verma the worm!—made the voyage down to Voyager Public Charter School last Wednesday to teach keiki about vermicomposting and to share some of MHC’s educational programs with them, such as a Hawaiian plant memory game and more.  While MHC’s educational staff doesn’t normally conduct off site school visits, a special outing was made to accommodate Voyager’s kindergarten through 2nd grade classes, as they couldn’t make it down to Mānoa Heritage Center when their older classmates—Grades 3-6—visited last month.
Our Mānoa Heritage Center Education Team—and Verma the worm!—made the voyage down to Voyager Public Charter School last Wednesday to teach keiki about vermicomposting and to share some of MHC’s educational programs with them, such as a Hawaiian plant memory game and more.  While MHC’s educational staff doesn’t normally conduct off site school visits, a special outing was made to accommodate Voyager’s kindergarten through 2nd grade classes, as they couldn’t make it down to Mānoa Heritage Center when their older classmates—Grades 3-6—visited last month.
Our Mānoa Heritage Center Education Team—and Verma the worm!—made the voyage down to Voyager Public Charter School last Wednesday to teach keiki about vermicomposting and to share some of MHC’s educational programs with them, such as a Hawaiian plant memory game and more. While MHC’s educational staff doesn’t normally conduct off site school visits, a special outing was made to accommodate Voyager’s kindergarten through 2nd grade classes, as they couldn’t make it down to Mānoa Heritage Center when their older classmates—Grades 3-6—visited last month.
1 month ago
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8/9
Discover and learn more about the complex world of Hawaiian bird songs with Dr. Patrick Hart, professor of biology at the University of Hawaiʻi at Hilo.  Conducted over Zoom and free of charge on Thursday, April 18, from 6pm to 7:15pm HST, this 75-minute talk will discuss the incredible diversity found in Hawaiian birdsong, as well as some of the impacts of habitat fragmentation and population decline on song-learning and repertoire.  Register for the talk with the link in our bio!
Discover and learn more about the complex world of Hawaiian bird songs with Dr. Patrick Hart, professor of biology at the University of Hawaiʻi at Hilo.  Conducted over Zoom and free of charge on Thursday, April 18, from 6pm to 7:15pm HST, this 75-minute talk will discuss the incredible diversity found in Hawaiian birdsong, as well as some of the impacts of habitat fragmentation and population decline on song-learning and repertoire.  Register for the talk with the link in our bio!
Discover and learn more about the complex world of Hawaiian bird songs with Dr. Patrick Hart, professor of biology at the University of Hawaiʻi at Hilo. Conducted over Zoom and free of charge on Thursday, April 18, from 6pm to 7:15pm HST, this 75-minute talk will discuss the incredible diversity found in Hawaiian birdsong, as well as some of the impacts of habitat fragmentation and population decline on song-learning and repertoire. Register for the talk with the link in our bio!
1 month ago
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9/9

Paintings, Prints, and Drawings of Hawaii

A special book and Kama‘aina perspective from the Sam and Mary Cooke Collection. Experience 18th to 20th century Hawaiian history through art.

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